Textured Vegetable Protein? No, thanks.

Question: When you think of “vegetable” what images come to mind? Personally, I picture carrots, onions, celery, leafy greens, tomatoes on the vine- that sort of thing. When manufacturers name something veggie or vegetable derived, they know this is the image we conjure up and market their products accordingly. Marketing is all about creating the right image.  Anything marked vegetable is healthy, right? One would think…

Well now, imagine my surprise upon learning that vegetable oil, for example, wasn’t made from the typical garden produce as the picture on the bottle hinted. Vegetable oil is soybean oil.

Yeah, um… I don’t see any pictures of soybeans on those bottles.

Mazola Vegetable Oil

So, considering what we know about vegetable oil I should have suspected the true origin of textured vegetable protein and steered clear, but I didn’t. And we ate it. This matters to me because, a few years ago, a wise healthcare provider suggested that I try cutting soy out of my diet to see if it would help control my raging hormones, since soy effects estrogen levels. It was in taking a closer look at my diet that I realized just how much of that particular vegetable we’d been consuming. The realization briefly made me want to become a soybean farmer because that stuff is in just about everything.

So, soy. I’ve avoid it for the past 3 years and am happier & healthier for it. Most noticeably, my acne has disappeared and stayed away, menstrual cycle became regular, mood swings and depression no longer have me in a stranglehold, and major pit odor is a thing of the past. I love being a girl! Which brings me to my recent use of textured vegetable protein and subsequent elimination of that item from the pantry.  Forever.

Textured-Vegetable-Protein

I was SO exited to find TVP in the bulk foods section of my grocery store and use it to stretch our ground beef.  I re-hydrated the freeze dried granules with hot water or broth and some tomato sauce along with whatever seasonings I liked for each particular dish. After soaking for a few minutes I’d cook it right in the pan with raw meat. The result was a seemless addition that even my husband couldn’t detect which tripled the amount of beef I had cooked. That’s right, instead of one meal from a pound of hamburger we got 3! I loved this stuff.

After two weeks of using it though, I was experiencing some unpleasant things like the return of acne and serious mood swings as well as upset stomach that just wouldn’t go away. So, I finally got around to looking into just what textured vegetable protein is… and was extremely disappointed. According to Bob’s Red Mill, one of the producers of this product,

“Textured Vegetable Protein is made from defatted soy flour that has been cooked under pressure and then dried.”

TVP

Nothing against Bob, I love his products, but that doesn’t sound good. Think about how much that (GMO?) soybean has  to go through to become this little protein packed nugget and the term “highly processed” comes to mind. I should have researched before trying something like this however, part of me just didn’t want to hear anything bad about my new favorite pantry staple. Oh, the shame- I’m guilty of willful ignorance to save a buck!

I haven’t used TVP in a week now and am seeing my unpleasant symptoms steadily decline. I usually use rice to stretch my beef and will continue to use that though would like to also try wheat berries and quinoa as alternatives. What tricks do you use to add extra nutrition and/or stretch the food dollar? I would love to hear some of your creative ideas! Thanks for reading 🙂

 

Cut Yourself Some Slack: Fast Food in the Meal Plan

Frozen Food Aisle

We all know it’s true: a good place to trim the budget is to eliminate eating out but I’m here to testify that being Susie Homemaker is easier said than done. If you find yourself making unplanned trips through the drive-thru each week because making dinner is inconvenient, you’re not alone. A lot of us are trying to find ways to save money and cut out unnecessary spending but there are plenty of reasons why we may find ourselves in line at the nearest fast food place on a weeknight. If you work outside the home it can be tough to find the time each day to fit it all in. Or maybe meal planning isn’t your strong suit then you probably don’t have the necessary ingredients on hand to prepare the meal you’d like to. Feel free to leave your own reason in the comments. Sister Solidarity!

I confess: years ago, when faced with the task of feeding a family, I was often out of inspiration and frustrated by mealtime so we ate at the golden arches at least twice a week. Each day I’d stand at the open fridge trying to come up with dinner on the fly and usually found myself making an unplanned trip the store to pick up extra ingredients in order to make dinner happen. What a hassle! Before I figured out how to plan ahead, shopping would consist of wandering up and down every aisle of the grocery store and throwing anything that inspired me into my cart, followed by going home, putting it all away and forgetting about most of what I’d just purchased.

In recent years I’ve learned that pre-planning our dinners each week gives me a more concrete shopping list to follow and allows me to be better prepared when it’s time to get cooking. I like having a dry erase board on the fridge to list the weekly dinners as a reminder to myself of what I had planned when I went shopping. I also plan at least one fast food night into our week in order to give myself a break. I call this approach “fast food on purpose” because it’s the unplanned dining out that kills the budget.

Fast food on purpose is easy stuff that requires little or no mixing and prep. If you already have such a meal in your pantry or freezer it’s much easier to avoid spending a Wednesday night at the local burger joint. If you like to do make-ahead meals to keep in the freezer then you’ve already got a stash of fast food ready to go. I personally don’t do many make-ahead meals so I like to take a little help from the freezer section of my grocery store. Here is a list of dinner ideas that can be prepared with pre-packaged items and save you from the drive-thru:


  • Entrees:

Chicken Burgers

  Family Pack Chicken Patties

Chimichangas

chimisenchilada sauceshredded_mexican-four-cheese

Fish & Chips

fish stickssteak friescole slaw

Fried Chicken

friedn chicken

Pizza

pizza

Chicken Parmesan with Pasta

ChickenParmagianaBarilla_Spaghetti

Chicken Nuggets

Crispy Chicken Strips

Chili Dogs

hot dog chili

Corn Dogs

corn dogs

Biscuits & Gravy

biscuitssausage gravy


  • Sides: 

Salad kits

caesar saladSouthwest salad

Pre-cut veggies & ranch dressing

veggie tray

frozen onion rings

onion rings

frozen french fries

ore_ida_fries

Macaroni & cheese

mac and cheese

Steamed microwavable veggies

mixed veg

Garlic Bread  

Instant Mashed Potatoes

Instant or microwave rice


This list is just a small sample of some of the options available in your local frozen foods section.  You can also find stir fry and casseroles, even breakfasts, all ready to cook. Planning ahead is the name of the game and even if you don’t have time to cook there are options available to put a good dinner on the table. And even if occasional pre-packaged food isn’t for you, there are options. You can try buying organic frozen foods of doing homemade freezer meals as an alternative. I personally consider this approach the lesser evil when compared with going out for a 99¢ heart attack in a sack. One thing that has helped me reach the goal of eating out less is to avoid pressure to prepare the perfect meal because for me, that’s just asking for trouble. I strive for home cooked and we do alright. 🙂 Happy meal planning!

Oatmeal Cookie Bars

I bake with oatmeal quite a bit. Chiefly because it’s cheap and lasts a long time in the pantry though also for it’s health benefits. During our baby years while there were infants to nurse, I’d eat plenty of oats everyday to help boost my milk supply. Now, I like to feed oatmeal to my kids in their snacks.

This recipe is one I make frequently because it’s quick to throw together and my husband in particular loves it. I adapted itIMG_0359_1 from a Holly Clegg recipe for low fat Oatmeal Cookies, making changes for convenience and our own personal taste preferences. This cookie bar has a creamy, chewy center and crispy exterior. It’s great for dipping in milk or to eat crumbled over ice cream. We also have them as a quick breakfast bar on the go or for a filling snack. I make a batch of these for my family every weekend to keep on hand for the school/work week. To change things up or for a special occasion I’ll add chocolate chips. This can also be made into a birthday cookie by baking into a pizza pan prepared with nonstick baking spray.

IMG_3205

Ingredients

  • 2/3 C oil (I prefer canola, use what you like)
  • 1 1/2 C brown sugar
  • 1 1/2 C sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 egg whites
  • 3 or 4 t vanilla extract
  • 3 C all purpose flour (or 1 1/2 C whole wheat & 1 1/2 C AP flour)
  • 2 t ground cinnamon
  • 2 t baking soda
  • 1/2 t salt
  • 3 cups old fashioned or quick cooking oatmeal

Method

Preheat your oven to 375 degrees and prepare a jelly roll pan with parchment paper overlapping the sides. You could also just spray the pan with baking spray but parchment allows for easy removal once the bars are cooked and cooled as well as much easier clean up when it’s time to do those dishes.

Combine the flour, cinnamon, baking soda and salt in a small bowl and set aside. In your mixing bowl combine the oil, sugars, eggs and vanilla. Mix until smooth. Add the flour mixture to the sugar mixture and stir until dry ingredients are completely incorporated. Stir in the oats.

Drop by heaping spatula or spoonfuls onto your prepared baking pan, dispersing evenly. This dough is a bit thick & sticky so rather than dropping the whole bowlful into the middle it helps to drop in little bits all over the pan and work the blobs together as evenly as possible. Once you’ve got the cookie dough spread across the pan place into the oven and bake for 18 minutes. Once baked remove to a cooling rack and cool in the pan. If baking with parchment, allow the bars to set a few minutes then you can pull them out by grasping the paper and remove to the cooling rack. Otherwise allow to cool in pan. Once cool, cut into bars and enjoy!

Homemade Fabric Softener!

I’ll admit to being a laundry nerd. Removing tough stains gives me joy and a sense of accomplishment. Caring for my family’s clothing allows it to last as long as possible while ensuring they’re clean and presentable and I find that strangely fulfilling. I’ve even been known to wash other people’s clothes (coats, blankies, kids car seat covers…) when they come to my house because I have have uptight perfectionist issues. It drives me nuts when my husband does a load because he doesn’t do it the way I would. I have to bite my tongue and thank him for his help though I’m dying to just rewash it all. What can I say? I’m a weirdo.

Perhaps the isolation of being a stay at home mom has made me a bit odd and I don’t have much else to keep me busy other than housework. At any rate, laundry is my thing. Also vacuuming- I look forward to getting our carpets clean and fluffy each day. Ah, the thrilling life of the homemaker! Anyhoo…

I’ve been using plain white vinegar as a fabric softener for the past 5 years and can vouch for the fact that it does work. It’s undoubtedly better than using nothing at all, which we did for several months before discovering the vinegar trick. White vinegar is cheap and eliminates static cling as well as build-up in your washer, but it isn’t the same as having luxuriously soft garments and towels like you’d get from Downy or Snuggle.

When I found that there were other alternatives to buying traditional fabric softener I had to try them out. Since this recipe (originally found on Wikihow) has been a success I’m excited to share it with you. This is a cheap and effective alternative to store bought softeners.

 IMG_3234

Ingredients

  • 6 Cups (1500 ml) hot water
  • 3 Cups (750 ml) white vinegar
  • 2 Cups (500 ml) hair conditioner

method

In a large pitcher, combine the hot water and conditioner then mix until smooth. I like to use a whisk for this step. Once the conditioner is completely mixed in, add the white vinegar and stir to combine. Transfer to your container (I reuse old vinegar bottles for this) and allow to cool completely before use. I like to let it sit overnight. Measure out 1/4 to 1/2 C of softener for each load of laundry. Administer as you would any other fabric softener, either via Downy ball, by adding before the rinse cycle or placing in your machine’s built-in dispenser. This amount makes about 3/4 of a gallon or 44 loads at a 1/4 cup each.

Your own cost will vary but here is what I spent:

  • 2 gal. of white vinegar for $4.83 (2 gal. makes 10 batches at about 48 cents a piece)
  • 2 12 oz. bottles of hair conditioner at 88 cents each (I used 1 and a half for this recipe, so we’ll say $1.32)

Total for about 88 oz. or 44 loads = $1.80

For the sake of comparison, in the first quarter of 2015, a 50 oz bottle of Snuggle costs about $4 and a 96 oz. bottle is about $7.

6 Reasons Moms Dread the First Day of School Too

I love when our kids are on summer break. We can play and explore while not having to watch the clock or stick to a rigid schedule. Another perk: casual dress and messy hair are totally fine. For them I mean. I’m a mess on the daily so more of the same here. Also I don’t have to be strict on bedtime which is nice because… laziness. Yep, summer is legit. Let’s itemize the reasons back to school sucks shall we?

IMG_2388

 

1. No more sleeping in I like the quiet summer mornings when my kids are sleeping in an hour later. I watch tv or do dishes, while slupring my mocha in peace. Me time, ya dig? And then when they do wake up all they want is to watch a show and stay in their pajamas for a while. This is the polar opposite of mornings during the school year.

2. Handing Them Off to Total Strangers We’re asked to blindly trust the public servants who will have our children at their mercy. Trust that they are competent in their job as educator and not at all abusive or creepy in any way. That’s a tough one to swallow.

3. Breaking the Bank Our school has a uniform policy which will be sorely missed when our daughters start middle school. It’s affordable and it’s an equalizer. But for two years we were in a different district that did not have uniforms and so I can speak from experience here: Having to keep our daughters stylish in order to give the mean kids less fodder isn’t cheap. However we still buy nice new backpacks, shiny light-up shoes, hair accessories that they’re sure to lose… It all adds up so bend over and kiss your cash goodbye.

4. From Playing to Sitting Still All summer long I push the kids outside to run and play and be fit. To get their wiggles out and to breathe fresh air. Recesses today are much shorter than they were when I was in elementary school in the ’80s and, in some places, have been cut out altogether. Educational demands are higher and so things like recess and music are being squeezed out to meet those standards which means our kids are asked to sit still for far longer than is natural and healthy. And with the amount of classwork they bring home there isn’t time to play after school either.

5. Sickness My kids get sick more during the school year than any other time. There are two things which parents who defend sending their sick kids to school like to say that really makes my ass hurt:

“Don’t be a germaphobe! You can’t keep kids from getting sick, they’re all going to get it no matter what you do so why try?” and “If I kept my kids home every time they were sick they’d miss the whole year which is just unrealistic.” 

If this is you, rethink your stance on hand washing and contagion and stuff because you’re doing it wrong. How about I wipe a booger on every one of you awesome people for making my kids miss weeks of school and costing us hundreds in Doctor’s visits & prescriptions each year? Huh? And (And!) for compromising the child that has a suppressed immune system or weak heart who has to swim in that petry dish alongside your snotting, coughing, non-handwashing kid? I would gladly be the finger of justice if it weren’t completely gross to do so. Okay, stepping down off the soap box and moving on…

6. Fundraisers I’m a boxtop clipping FIEND and am more than happy to support the PTA but loathe having to hit up friends & family to shell out money for some cheap (expensive! $12 for wrapping paper? You must be trippin’) stuff that nobody needs just to raise money for I-don’t-know-what. Run-on sentences are my thing, okay? Also, I resent the school using my kids as little salespeople blatantly exploiting their cuteness to make a buck. Sure, for a good cause but still…

My list of complaints is multi-tiered and ultra whiny so I’ve summed it up for you.  No doubt you, The Reader, could add a few to this list or give me a good upbraiding for my crappy attitude. To each his own and all that. Yesterday I saw our girls off on their first day and it went well. They were both so excited to get to school- especially the Kindergartner. I took about 30 or 40 pictures to remember the day by and then followed the bus to school to get more pictures. I keep scrap books as momentos to remember their school years and therefore have to acknowledge that it isn’t all bad. In fact, I sometimes wonder if I’ll ever be the Mom who celebrates at the bus stop and chugs mimosas with the neighbor ladies out of sheer relief that the kids are finally back to school. Not quite there yet but I’m sure I will be. Someday?

IMG_2391

Stuffed Shells and Stocking Up on Freezer Meals

IMG_1421

I haven’t had a chance to photograph this recipe yet, so how about a random picture of an onion instead? Aren’t vegetables beautiful? So, any-hoo… my husband calls this recipe amazing. I usually get comments like, “Whoa. How do you make this? It’s SO GOOD!” My shells aren’t mushy in texture and hold their shape well. Another mark in their favor is that Stuffed Shells is one of those recipes that makes more than we can possibly eat at once so I always have an extra pan for the freezer. Bonus! Doubling something I’m already cooking is pretty much my approach to building up a stash of freezer meals. There are also a few things I like to cook ahead and freeze for faster meal prep later like:

  • Rice: Next time you make rice, do a double batch. To reheat, just add 2 tablespoons of liquid for each cup of rice; microwave or cook in a saucepan (on the stove) until heated through. Will keep in the freezer for up to 6 months.
  • Ground Beef: I buy beef on sale and usually come home with 5 to 10 pounds at a time. The trick is to process the meat ASAP to preserve and get it ready for quick dinners later. I brown some and make burger patties or meatballs out of the rest. See my recipe for ground beef mix here.
  • Tomato Sauce: I like to buy a giant can of peeled, whole tomatoes and make up a bunch of spaghetti sauce for the freezer. On Italian night I go to my freezer for a package of pre-cooked ground beef, a jar of sauce and some Texas Toast. Boil noodles and toss a quick salad and dinner is done in under 30 minutes.
  • Shredded Cheese: Once in a while I get a really good deal on cheese and buy a lot of it. To freeze cheese grate it and package in airtight freezer bags with as little air inside as possible. Whole bricks of cheese will crumble upon thawing but shredding it eliminates that particular issue. Thawed cheese melts just fine so I pull it out to make cheese sauce, top casseroles, quesadillas and even sprinkle on sandwiches.

I don’t have to put aside a special time to do freezer cooking since things like homemade sauce, casseroles or soup can be made in larger quantities with very little added time & effort and stashed for a night when I just really need a break.

Stuffed Shells

  • 8 oz. cream cheese, cubed
  • 1 sweet onion, minced
  • 1 C mayo
  • 3 C shredded cheddar
  • 3 C shredded mozzarella
  • 1 lb. ground beef, browned & drained
  • 1 T minced garlic
  • 1/4 t Salt & 1/2 t pepper
  • 1T Italian seasoning
  • 2 jars of spaghetti sauce
  • 1 12 oz. box jumbo pasta shells

Boil shells according to package instructions. Be sure to salt the water to help reduce sticky pasta. You can also add a little oil. Stir gently & frequently to avoid clumping. Remove shells to a single layer on wax paper. Brown beef with garlic & onion, drain.  In a large glass mixing bowl and microwave 30 seconds to soften. Stir in mayo, Italian seasoning, salt & pepper completely. Then add shredded cheese and ground beef and to create your filling. I skip this step and pull pre-cooked ground beef ready to use from the freezer. Prepare your baking pans with a little sauce to cover the bottom of each. Spoon filling into shells being careful not to over-stuff them, about 1 1/2 T. Arrange shells in your baking dish then ladle sauce to cover and top with more cheese if desired. I like to use a little cheddar on top. Cover with foil, bake 35 minutes until hot and bubbly.

To make ahead: Prepare but don’t bake. Cover tightly with plastic wrap then foil and refrigerate for up to 24 hours or freeze for up to 2 months. Remove the plastic and replace foil to bake- refrigerated 40-50 minutes, frozen 2 hours.

Saving Money on Diapers: Name Brand vs. Generic

IMG_1761

There’s a significant price difference between brand name and generic disposable diapers. I’ve done a price comparison of 5 national diaper brands to illustrate the savings. All prices are Wal-Mart’s and all counts are for a size 6, which our son currently wears.

I came up with the yearly total based on the number of diapers we use a week times 52 weeks rounded to the nearest hundred: 2400. I divided that number by the count per box then multiplied the price of each box by 52 to get the annual estimated totals. These parameters give us an example of the considerable price differences among brands. Save money, buy generic.


Large Package

  • Huggies Snug & Dry: 100 ct., $34.97 (34¢/diaper) =$827 
  • Parent’s Choice: 92 ct., $19.77 (21¢/diaper) = $514
  • Up + Up: 120 ct., $28.99 (24¢/diaper) =$579
  • Pampers Baby Dry: 128 ct., $45.60 (36¢/diaper) = $866
  • Luvs: 112 ct., $31 (28¢/diaper)= $682

Medium Package

  • Huggies Snug & Dry: 64 ct., $20.97 (33¢/diaper) =$796
  • Parent’s Choice: 60 ct., $13.97 (23¢/diaper) = $558
  • Up + Up: 60 ct., $16.99 (28¢/diaper) =$679
  • Pampers Baby Dry: 64 ct., $24.94 (39¢/diaper) = $947
  • Luvs: 54 ct., $15.97 (30¢/diaper)= $718

Small Package

  • Huggies Snug & Dry: 23 ct., $8.97 (39¢/diaper) =$941
  • Parent’s Choice: 23 ct., $5.97 (26¢/diaper) = $626
  • Up + Up: 23 ct., $6.99 (30¢/diaper) =$733
  • Pampers Baby Dry: 21 ct., $8.97 (43¢/diaper) = $1,031
  • Luvs: 21 ct., $6.97 (33¢/diaper)$801

I think that a lot of people don’t consider the cheaper brands of diapers because they assume that the quality must be sub-par. Truth be told, some store brands are junk. For example, I can vouch for the fact that the Parent’s Choice brand (sold at WalMart) used to be total garbage several years ago when we were diapering our first baby. However, since then they’ve redesigned and are now comparable to Huggies in fit and absorbency much like the Target Up + Up brand. Parent’s choice is the brand we use because it happens to fit our son well, Target’s didn’t. Luvs is way too perfumey so I skip those as well. Every brand has a different fit so I say,  give a few generics a tryout to find a good fit for your baby and your wallet. Your homemaker paycheck could get a raise of several hundred bucks a year!

Copycat Rice-a-roni

Whenever I’ve bought a box of Rice-a-roni or Hamburger Helper and cooked it up for dinner my family is like, “Oh, man this is so good! You should make this all the time! I love this stuff!” Prepackaged, sodium-filled, preservative-ridden food is their favorite. I can’t blame them, it is delicious. My Mom conscience, however, won’t allow me to feed them crap on a regular basis so I try to make the things they like from scratch instead. I can make more for less and it will have fewer ingredients which quiets my inner critic that nags me to feed them all natural, BPA free, non-GMO, sustainable organic, whole foods at every meal. I strive for not fast-food and usually succeed, so pipe down inner critic.

Tonight I’m making my homemade version of Beef Rice-a-roni but I also do this recipe with chicken which is the same method but substituting chicken breast and chicken broth for the beef. Everything else is the same.


IMG_1928

Homemade Hamburger Rice

Serves 6-8 plus leftovers. We love leftovers.

  • 1-2 lbs. ground beef, browned & drained
  • 5 1/4 -1/2 C beef broth (I mix up some bouillon)
  • 4 T butter, margarine or oil
  • 3 Cups white rice
  • 1 pkg vermicelli

    Toasting the rice & pasta

Brown  & drain your beef then set aside or, you can take a page from my book and pull your pre-cooked ground beef out of the fridge or freezer ready to go. Melt the butter in a large skillet. Add uncooked rice and vermicelli and stir frequently to toast until you can smell the roasty toasty buttery goodness and start to see pieces of rice & pasta turn golden. Add the beef and broth and stir to combine. Bring to a boil then cover and reduce heat to low. Let cook without opening or stirring for 20 minutes or until rice is tender. Serve.

Note: I use a 12″ deep-sided skillet with a lid for this recipe. If you don’t have one this recipe can be halved and made in a smaller skillet. The vermicelli I use can usually be found in the Hispanic foods section of the grocery store. 

Butter Wrappers, Cereal Bags & the Income of a Homemaker

use-it-upAs a homemaker, my “income” can be how much money I save by “making do”. I’m inspired by past generations of resourceful homemakers when it comes to making do. In WWII folks were encouraged to plant “victory” gardens and make do on rations to support the troops. We could learn a lot from those women who could feed and clothe a family with very little.

Look, I may not be cashing a pay check anymore but I’m also not spending anywhere near as much as I did back then. I can’t walk and chew bubblegum, that’s to say I kind of suck at multitasking anymore than necessary… so if I was working, we’d spend more money just buying the convenience items that allow many a busy Mom to take care of her family as well as bring home the bacon. Yes that was a major run-on sentence because I also suck at writing. We’d be spending more on gas, my wardrobe, makeup, my hair (gotta look good in the office) not to mention childcare, and still take care of the home. Working Moms are amazing.

So, spend less money. That’s the goal. In order for me to stay at home with the kids, I didn’t just quit working; we didn’t just lose an income, we had to change the way we live or else it wouldn’t work. And for a while there it damn near didn’t… There are a million & one things to buy when you’re shopping for a household, especially one with kids in it. Those supplies add up and become a huge chunk of the budget because there is just so much everyone needs. So, cutting costs is the goal.

I make money by saving money and one way to achieve that is to really get your money’s worth from the items you buy; squeezing every last drop out of things and being a total cheapskate. I admit though, this lifestyle isn’t for everyone and if you don’t do as I do, that’s super! High-five! You’re doing everything you can to make a home for your family and you’re rocking it your own way. Get it girl. This is just my way. You’re all awesome. I mean it.

IMG_1897

In earlier posts I mentioned cutting costs by not buying cleanerspaper towels & plastic baggies. That is my mindset- what can we do without?  How can we make do? Do we really need to buy that or can we use something we already have to get the same result? In that vein, do you remember Home Ec. class? Do they still have that? I took Home Economics in the 9th grade and still remember many of the lessons from that class because I actually use those lessons in real life. One trick our teacher taught us was to use your butter wrappers to grease baking pans or griddles and I practice that to this day. I keep butter & margarine wrappers in a plastic container in the freezer to use as needed. Keep in mind that butter is a perishable and will go bad on you. So I store the wrappers in the freezer and then when I need to rub down a pan the heat of my hand thaws it immediately. Nifty, huh? After reusing a wrapper once, I finally do throw it away.

Another thing I save is the plastic bag that cereal comes in. Someone once told me they make great piping bags for frosting & stuff but that turned out to be a bust- literally. The seams on the side of the cereal bag won’t hold up to the pressure of piping which, if you think about it, makes sense. Those seams are designed to open easily so you can get the cereal out.

IMG_1920IMG_1919

So, no, to piping bags but YES to freezer bags! When I open a bag of frozen vegetables and only use part of it, a handy cereal bag is a great way to store what’s left without having frozen corn rolling all over the inside of your freezer. I seal it with a twist tie or just fold it over. Also, I use freezer bags- excuse me, cereal bags- to wrap baked goods like banana bread, meatballs, what-have-you, and freeze. If you’re a little paranoid about freezer burn (I am) then wrap the food in plastic wrap, aluminum foil  or both, first. How much money did you save this week? Well what if I told you that’s an income? Nice, huh?